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Toxicity

This tag is associated with 26 posts

Finding our Highly Sensitive Voice: Building Sensory Literacy


Deep listening to highly sensitive children allowed me to deal with life from their perspective and to become their advocate. This process is important, as we model for them how to communicate their specific needs, they will develop the vocabulary to built their own voice and eventually advocate for their own needs. Building sensory literary … Continue reading

Toxic Stress


Imagine that you see a bear while walking through a forest. In response to this threat, your body switches into “fight or flight” mode. To survive, your body releases emergency stress hormones, like adrenaline and cortisol, that cause your heartbeat to quicken, make your eyes dilate and focus your mind on the threat at hand—everything … Continue reading

Inputs: The Hidden Dimensions of a Sensitive Sensory Life


Beginning to discuss highly sensitive children health means understanding what a heightened sensory or other kinds of heightened experiences are and how they influence how a child perceives the world. Given the spatial embodied knowledge is vital to the experiences of highly sensitive people, we will begin by examining the nature of space at a … Continue reading

The Culture of Stress


Another hidden cause of stress for highly sensitive children is our western culture. Many children attend desensitized school worlds. Most schools are loud, bright and chaotic environments that tend to provoke sensory overflow. In Toronto, public schools were designed by the same architect who designed our jails, they are visually unappealing, their corridors echoes, many … Continue reading

▶ TEDMED 2014: Elizabeth Kenny – YouTube


This is a frightening story… Really worth watching… A great example of the toxicity that can be created by the medical system. Actor and playwright Elizabeth Kenny performs an excerpt from her play dramatizing her horrifying journey through the American medical system. via ▶ TEDMED 2014: Elizabeth Kenny – YouTube.

Sugar toxic to mice in ‘safe’ doses, test finds — ScienceDaily


When mice ate a diet of 25 percent extra sugar — the mouse equivalent of a healthy human diet plus three cans of soda daily — females died at twice the normal rate and males were a quarter less likely to hold territory and reproduce, according to a toxicity test developed at the University of … Continue reading

‘Darwinian’ test uncovers an antidepressant’s hidden toxicity — ScienceDaily


Because of undetected toxicity problems, about a third of prescription drugs approved in the U.S. are withdrawn from the market or require added warning labels limiting their use. An exceptionally sensitive toxicity test invented at the University of Utah could make it possible to uncover more of these dangerous side effects early in pharmaceutical development … Continue reading

Boredom as Sensory Stress


Besides the toxic elements I have mentioned above, there are a few others that any parents must be on the look out for when dealing with sensory processing sensitivities. Under-arousal can lead to stress as well. Continually being bored and without appropriate stimulation can be very stressful. Boredom ends in drudgery and drudgery will make … Continue reading

Space, technology and people as sensory overload


In The Globe and Mail article ” Why is walking in the woods so good for you?”, Alex Hutchinson explores the results from a study, which will appear in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Affective Disorders, that found that volunteers suffering from depression who took a 50-minute walk in a woodland park improved … Continue reading

Time: How our past ancestors influence our present lives.


Recently, researchers have begun to demonstrate that the exposure of past generations to toxins are affecting current generations. According to the article ” Today’s Environment Influences Behavior Generations Later: Chemical Exposure Raises Descendants’ Sensitivity to Stress” ScienceDaily (2012)[i], researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Washington State University have seen an increased reaction … Continue reading

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