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highly sensitive family

This tag is associated with 69 posts

Finding our Highly Sensitive Voice: Building Sensory Literacy


Deep listening to highly sensitive children allowed me to deal with life from their perspective and to become their advocate. This process is important, as we model for them how to communicate their specific needs, they will develop the vocabulary to built their own voice and eventually advocate for their own needs. Building sensory literary … Continue reading

Sensory Environmental Diet


According to scent chemist Steve Pearce[i], the sense of smell is by far the most powerful of all our senses, yet it is also our most underrated sense. Smell is the only one of our senses directly hard-wired to our brains. As such, it is the direct extension of the brain. Its direct contact means … Continue reading

Layer 3: The Body – A Behavioural Medium of Responses to Sensory Experiences


The body has an internal and external plane. The internal plane regulates what is going on inside of us. The external plane relates to elements from the outside world that influence the body and visa versa that the body influences. On the internal plane, we can observe highly sensitive child behaviours using the traditional holistic … Continue reading

The Behavioural Dimension of Sensing


The first clue sensory experiences may be unbalanced is a child’s behaviour. An over-stimulated child who does not yet have the literacy nor the words to express sensory distress will turn to “out of control” behaviours to indicate something is wrong. If as a parent we can learn to recognize that cue, we can then … Continue reading

The Hidden Dimensions of Sensory Perception


Part 1: Inputs: The Hidden Dimensions of Sensory Perception According to Dr. Aron, a characteristic of highly sensitive children is their sensory processing sensitivity. Sensory processing sensitivity is proposed to be an innate trait associated with greater sensitivity to environmental and social stimuli (Aron et al. 2012)[i]. Researchers Nilda Cosco and Robin Moore explain that … Continue reading

Chapter 5: Conclusion


Conclusion: The Need For A framework to Decolonize the Senses Whereas Ancient health wisdoms understood that our senses and space are central to our well being, modern cultures have colonized space and the senses, and led us to forget their importance. In the process we lost access to the wisdoms and knowledge of the past … Continue reading

reblogged: Depressive thinking can accompany being a high sensitivity personality


Excerpt: Intuitive people and HSPs may go to dark places In her article Growing Up Gifted Is Not Easy, Elaine Aron, PhD talks about this dark aspect of sensitivity. “Early in my research on sensitivity — while I was studying its relationship to introversion and the four Jungian functions of sensing, thinking, feeling, and intuition … Continue reading

reblogged: Highly sensitive people: latent inhibition and creativity


Excerpt: ” One aspect of high sensitivity is increased sensory input. There are some intriguing research studies on how this works at the level of the brain and nervous system, and how it affects creative ability.” Read the entire article at: http://highlysensitive.org/64/highly-sensitive-people-latent-inhibition-and-creativity/

Chapter 1: Distressed In A Disembodied Culture – Introduction – Draft 2


When you lose touch with inner stillness you lose touch with yourself, when you lose touch with yourself you lose yourself in the world – Eckhart Tolle Heightened sensory abilities create fundamental, yet invisible, distinctions in how a highly sensitive child perceives the world.  Highly sensitive children begin to define and understand themselves and their … Continue reading

Distraction or Sensory Seeking? – Sensory Integration Disorder


Distraction or Sensory Seeking? by Terri Mauro Another common difficulty for parents of children with sensory integration disorder is telling the difference between distractibility and sensory-seeking behavior. Is your child really ignoring you, or is he just preoccupied with finding the sensory input he needs to feel safe, comfortable, and alert? Ask yourself these questions: … Continue reading

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