//
archives

HSChildren

This category contains 42 posts

Layer 5: Awareness: Senses, Others, Environment, emotional Responses, Neurons, Empathy, Balance, Genes


Sensory self-awareness seems complex in that sensory communication includes all the previous layers, which are intertwined in a dance of influence with one another that impacts how our senses react. If one of these elements is out of balance, how we perceive the world changes. As highly sensitive children develop awareness, they can begin to … Continue reading

Highly Sensitive Children’s Holistic Experience of the Environment: Identity and Sensory Experiences of Spatial and Social contexts


Holistic Experience of the Environment: Identity and Sensory Experiences of Spatial and Social contexts Interestingly, the quadrivia approach, that we saw earlier, reinforces from a theoretical perspective what aboriginal culture already articulated: a child exists in a social context, a family, a community and the world. Adapted from Cindy Blacksock’s aboriginal health model, which we … Continue reading

Reblogged: Why You Feel Too Much (and How to Cope)


Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) manifests in many small, sometimes maddening ways. Itchy tags may be unbearable. Loud music intolerable. Perfume simply sickening. Whatever the specific symptoms, SPD makes it difficult to interact with your daily environment. Here are strategies for living better with SPD. by Carol Stock Kranowitz, M.A. Read the article at: http://www.additudemag.com/slideshow/229/slide-1.html?utm_source=eletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=july

Reblogged: Is It ADHD or Auditory Processing Disorder?


Does your child struggle to block out background noise, follow conversations or pronounce words correctly? Is she hypersensitive to sound? She may have an auditory processing disorder in addition to, or mistaken for, ADHD. Read the entire article at: http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/731.html

Highly Sensitive Children’s Sensory Health Framework


HSC’s Sensory Health Framework The subsequent framework is based on the following hypotheses: 1) Highly sensitive children uniquely combine heightened sensory intelligence to other forms of intelligence, which impart them with a different identity formation. 2) The characteristics of modern space influence highly sensitive children’s sensory experiences and, as a result, their well being. 3) … Continue reading

Chapter 5: Conclusion


Conclusion: The Need For A framework to Decolonize the Senses Whereas Ancient health wisdoms understood that our senses and space are central to our well being, modern cultures have colonized space and the senses, and led us to forget their importance. In the process we lost access to the wisdoms and knowledge of the past … Continue reading

A Highly Sensitive Child’s Unitive Sensory Experience


A Highly Sensitive Child’s Unitive Sensory Experience Understanding the nature of a highly sensitive child’s sensory experience is crucial, yet not necessarily easy, as what is sensed may not be obvious. Their ability to read subtleties implies that highly sensitive children are holistic and empathic thinkers. One of the most common distinctions in the literature … Continue reading

Roots of Attention Overexitability


Roots of Attention Overexitability Such preoccupations seem particularly important at a time when an ADHD diagnose immediately calls upon the use of medication. If these drugs can help children operate quietly in the existing social and cultural constructions of our world, in the case of highly sensitive children and any type of gifted child, they … Continue reading

Attention as part of an Intelligence spectrum


Attention spectrum as part of an Intelligence spectrum Howard Gardner and Thomas Hatch[1] identified nine types of intelligence that reflect extra “sensitivities” to the world: Naturalist Intelligence, Musical Intelligence, Logical-Mathematical Intelligence (Number/Reasoning Smart), Existential Intelligence, Interpersonal Intelligence (people Smart), Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence (“Body Smart”), Linguistic Intelligence (Word Smart), Intra-personal Intelligence (Self Smart”), Spatial Intelligence (“Picture Smart”). … Continue reading

Highly Sensitive Children


Highly Sensitive Children Highly sensitive people have a nervous system that is more sensitive to subtleties. This means that regular sensory information is processed and analyzed to a greater extent, which contributes to creativity, intuition, sensing implications and attention to detail, but which may also cause quick over-stimulation and over-arousal (Aron, 1996)[1]. These individuals could … Continue reading

Categories